Derived from the Greek word “Triskeles” meaning “three legs”, the Triskele or Triple Spiral, is an ancient Celtic symbol. Often referred to by many as a Triskelion, its earliest creation dates back to the Neolithic era, as it can be seen at the entrance of Newgrange, Ireland. The Triskele gained popularity in its use within the Celtic culture from 500BC onwards. This archaic symbol is one of the most difficult to decipher as symbolists believe it to be reflective of many areas of culture from its early time to the present day.

Derived from the Greek word “Triskeles” meaning “three legs”, the Triskele or Triple Spiral, is an ancient Celtic symbol. Often referred to by many as a Triskelion, its earliest creation dates back to the Neolithic era, as it can be seen at the entrance of Newgrange, Ireland. The Triskele gained popularity in its use within the Celtic culture from 500BC onwards. This archaic symbol is one of the most difficult to decipher as symbolists believe it to be reflective of many areas of culture from its early time to the present day.

Firstly, the triskele can be thought to represent motion as all three arms are positioned to make it appear as if it is moving outwards from its center. This movement is believed to signify the movement of three energies. The original meaning of these moving arms is assumed to be some form of action, cycles, progress, revolution, and competition.

Secondly, and more for symbolists, is the exact symbolic significance of the three arms of the triskele. This differs through era, culture, mythology, and history, which is why there are so many variations as to what the symbol of the triple spiral originally represented.

Some guesses are: life-death-rebirth, spirit-mind-body, mother-father-child, past-present-future, power-intellect-love, creation-preservation-destruction, to name but a few.

However, some symbologists believe it to be a variant of the more triangular trinity knot which is believed to represent three Celtic worlds; the spiritual world, the present world, and the celestial world.

Like many things, it ultimately represents the interpretation you bestow upon it. I found this symbol for the first time in O Cebreiro Spain. This ancient Galician town, rich in Celtic history still plays the music of harps, penny whistles, and bagpipes in the storefronts and it does not take much to momentarily feel like you have walked back in time nearly 1,500 years.

I was so drawn to this we decided to stay a couple of nights to rest and it is a perfect stop for tired pilgrims in need of a respite. The views from here are spectacular and the space is perfect also for introspection as there is a sense of sacred space here as well.

Having rested well, I went back to an old Celtic shop to revisit the pendant I was drawn to and decided to buy it. I knew there was some reason for my attraction to it and it would reveal its meaning with time. The Triskelion pendant went into my pack to continue the remainder of my journey to Santiago and eventually to the USA where I would eventually investigate my attraction to the symbol.

UPDATE 2020

The symbol has spoken to me in many aspects of my life but it is clear now, as it sits on my desk, It is time to allow the spirals of stories in my life, that have some significance to me and perhaps will have some significance or interest for you to unravel.

This category of my blog is perhaps going to be my most personal. The diary of the Triskelion. Here, I will share with you stories from my life and travels that are of spiritual significance. I will do my best to share my heightened experiences from a grounded perspective. Much of my first sharings will come from my two walks on the Camino because it is the most natural opening for this blog even though I have had many great spiritual adventures before and since the triskelion symbol arrives as a message to tell my stories in multiple categories.

My father wanted to be a writer and when he wrote, he wrote well but he did not push hard enough to risk the mistakes, the criticism, and the risk of possibly not being able to make a penny doing it. I often wonder if he led me to that symbol in O Cebreiro. He loved Celtic music and would often sing songs of Irish and Scottish folk music when he played the guitar. If he were ever planning to send a message that is a place he was likely to cross the veil and offer it.

Perhaps it is I who will become the writer and perhaps we will do some writing together. I wonder…

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *